Qin-strumming Etiquette, from Xilutang Qintong

Fuqin Jue 《撫琴訣》
(Rules of Qin-Strumming)

By Wang Zhi, in Xilutang Qintong (1549), Folio IV;
Translated by Juni Yeung

Original Source of Fuqin Jue from Xilutang Qintong, Folio IV.

 

When playing the qin, regardless of whether there are people nearby, one must play as if facing your elders. Placing the qin to the front of you, the body must be upright, your energies and spirits at peace and settled.

Collect your heart and cut off all worries, focus on your emotions and intentions.

Fingers do not give false strikes, and strings do not give false rings.

One does not look at the right hand, but only listen to its sounds.

The eyes do not look elsewhere, nor the ears listen to anything else.

When the heart does not think other thoughts, that is when one achieves the meaning of the qin. It is essential to recognize the sentencing and phrasing of rhythm, while there mustn’t be too many pauses or stops. Li Mian [Tang era, 717-788CE] noted, “Yin [vibratos] and stops are well-measured, while slowness and speed are orderly. Hurriedly, but not messy. Leisurely, but not stopping. Neither hurriedly or leisurely, like drifting clouds and flowing water. This is the crucial essence.”

Use of fingers must include both flesh and nail, in order to give a crisp sound. Too much nail and the sound is scorched. Too much flesh and the tone is convoluted. Both left and right hands cannot over-exaggerate.

There are three types of sound on the qin: First is san (open), second is an (pressed), third is fan (harmonics). Each pluck is like breaking the strings but the fingers pluck shallowly. Pressing the strings into the wood are to be firm but strength cannot be seen. Fan sounds are to be played near the bridge, lightly touching the string where the hui marker is with a brief point [of the fingertip], and its sound shall be clear and rounded.

If the body wavers and the neck twists often, pandering left and right, looking up and down, or if the facial expressions change, it is as if one is ashamed.

Or, if one’s eyesight scurries about, panting in with heavy breath, without regulation in advances and retreats, with a lax spirit or form, it will reflect itself in form of sound. Although the fingerings are right, the resonances of the sound will be messy and it cannot conform to the Five [proper] Sounds.

Not tuning the strings properly, playing heavily when it should be played lightly, or playing quick when it should be slow – all of these are major diseases [faults] to playing.

The rule of playing the qin, is to be simple and clean. It is not in asking for one as a person to be calm, but in one’s hands. The throbbing of the fingers is called being raucous, while being concise, lightly-treading on a steady pace is called being calm.

It is unnecessary to wobble the [left] finger outside of the sound. Let the proper sound be harmonious and smooth, and that will be good.

For the Junzi [Superior Person] of antiquity creates [regulates] to the causes of matters, he attenuates himself to pleasuring the mind, or describes his heart with irony, or expresses his lone resentment to transmit his ambitions. Hence it [i.e. the music] is able to focus the essence of sincerity, and move the spirits and gods.

One may only know three or five etudes, but refine it to the limits of excellence. However students of our day, perceive ability by sheer quantity. Hence the idiom “Sheer quantity leads to lack of quality. Quality leads to less quantity.” May the Junzi who understands true sound [i.e. friends] pay attention to this.

Here we have the rules of playing qin. What is difficult to procure are the scores to the music, for they must be requested to be passed down from the masters. Furthermore, fingerings and rhythm cannot be exhaustively detailed in the work of writing, so when facing a manuscript to play, we often only get its sound, but its profound intricacies in tempo and rhythm are forgone. This is like having rough measuring tools – you have the drawn shapes, but it lacks the precision that fine tools give.

In more prosaic terms, any given piece can be roughly divided into three sections: First slow, then tense, and finally slack. From slow to tense to stop forms the motif to a piece of music.

Often times there are indications of “do two times from mark.” (從勾二作) Play through it plainly the first time, to finish off the motif from the last sentence. Pause, and in the second play-through, play it strongly. From playing strong and then easing gradually and finishing with a powerful strike-in, forms the continuation to the sounds afterward. One must make the front and back relate with each other, clearly differentiating the beginning from the end.

Another example is the “Perform three times with spaced gou.” (三作間勾, i.e. Da-jiangou) First play the two sounds, pause, then respond to the previous section with four sounds, and finish off with one powerful strike-in.

A nine-tone long chain (chang-suo, ) involves playing two sounds, pause, and finish off with seven strong notes. This induces rise and fall at the front and back, connecting the motifs by arteries and veins, leaving its resonance drifting as if fading but still slowly progressing, and then a jolt at the end.

From slow to tense, and from tense to leisurely, if control of fastness and slowness is appropriate, and yin [vibratos] and stops do not lose their degree, then naturally the strings will resonate with clear rings. Sounds should preferably be clear, aim for simple and calm, and must not be messy. This is how an elegant, antiquated motif of profound emptiness is.

And this is why the intricacies are so hard to attain for manuscripts then and now. So for those self-studying the qin, and have yet to receive transmission from a master, it is best to focus your mind and dedication and ponder on these words. Follow the fingerings according to the manuscript to the hands, meticulously and slowly, accumulate one sound onto the next, section unto section. After days and months of practice, the heart and intention will connect, and the hands will automatically do its job. Then, you will naturally attain mastery as the ancients have.

As proverb has it: “When practice is perfected, it is the same.” [Doctrine of the Mean, 20]  The act of strumming the qin is precious in its accumulated progress, as prolonged experience leads to expertise. If one is eager and greedy for more, wanting for speed leads to one unable to arrive at the destination and all is then for naught, which must be avoided. I shall leave the essay on this note for students of the future to read, to dispel their anxious doubts.

Original text is as follows:

鼓琴時,無問有人無人,常如對長者。掣琴在前身須端直。
安定神氣,精心絕慮,情意專注。指不虛下,弦不錯鳴。不視右手,只聞其聲。
目不別視,耳不別聽,心不別思,乃得琴之旨焉。
大要識句讀節奏,停歇不得過多。李勉曰:吟抑有度,遲速有節,急而不亂、緩而不絕。
不緩不急,如行雲流水,此為樞要也。
用指必須甲肉相兼,出聲清麗。甲多聲焦,肉多聲濁。右/左手不得過度。
琴聲凡三:一曰散、二曰按、三曰泛、
彈似斷弦插指淺;按若入木不見力;泛則近岳而彈。徽沾弦而點摭。
其音清且圓也。若身搖頸動,盼視左右,顧瞻上下,面色變易,有如慚恥,
或眼目疾游,喘息氣麤,進退無度,形神散漫.至於取聲,
雖能用指,聲韻雜亂,不盡五音,調弦不切。
當輕而重,當慢而速,皆是大病。
彈琴之法,必須簡淨。非謂人靜,乃手靜也。
手指鼓動謂之喧,簡要輕穩謂之靜。
不須聲外搖指,正聲和暢,方為善矣。
故古之君子,皆因事而制。
或怡情以自適,或諷諫以寫心,
或幽憤以傳志,故能專注精誠,感動鬼神
或只能三五操,而極精妙。
今之學者,惟多為能,故曰﹕多則不精,精則不多。知音君子詳察焉。

夫彈琴之法,難得者曲譜,曲譜必求師傳。
蓋曲譜中指法節奏非筆墨所能盡,所以對譜彈琴,往往徒得其聲,而于疾徐節奏多不能造妙,
亦猶規矩之粗得其方圓,而不能備其工巧。
姑以淺近者言之:一曲中分作三段。一慢、二緊、三緩。
從緩入緊,至煞意,而成一曲是也。譜中有從勾二作者,必分為二段:先一作平其聲,以結前段之意。

少息後一作取聲猛壯,猛而漸緩,以續後聲。必須前後相關,始終不雜。
又如三作間勾者,先兩聲,少息,應前段後四聲猛彈入間勾,以接後聲
如至長鎖九聲,前兩聲少息,以結前段﹐後七聲雄壯,以接後聲,令有起伏之意。
大要使其脈絡聯綴,遺音俳徊欲斷而緩續。
欲盡而不盡,然後猛起以發弦。從慢入緊,從緊至緩,若緩急得合其宜,吟抑不失其度,自弦中節餘響鏗鏘,取音欲清圖簡靜,不可亂雜,庶有古雅沖澹之意。

此乃古今譜操難得之妙也。然私學琴者,未遇師傳。得此曲譜,宜專心致志,仔細玩味。
按其譜中指法運之於手,詳緩而彈,逐聲而累一聲加於一聲、一段加於一段。
若日積月深。習之既久,心契意悟。手自相應,自然可到古人妙處。

所謂及其成功則一也。 大抵彈琴貴於積累而進,久則自精。若急躁貪多,欲速則不能達,終無所成。
切宜深戒,予故備論之,以貽後學覽者。其毋惑焉。

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1 Comment (+add yours?)

  1. Xu
    Apr 09, 2012 @ 19:56:11

    very useful both english and original version. thnx

    Reply

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